which of these is recommended as a natural shelter if lost in the wild?

How to make natural shelters
If you are in a wooded area and have enough natural materials, you can make a field of relevance without the help of tools or with a knife. It takes longer to create this kind of protection than others, but it will protect you from the elements. You must […]
Of dnewsveröffentlicht on 9/10/2011 at 16: 10
If you are in a wooded area and have enough natural materials, you can make a field of relevance without the help of tools or with a knife. It takes longer to create this kind of protection than others, but it will protect you from the elements.

You will need two trees (or vertical poles) about 2 meters apart; one pole about 2 meters long and 2.5 centimeters in diameter; five to eight poles about 3 meters long and 2.5 centimeters in diameter for beams; cord or vines to attach to the horizontal support to the trees; and other poles,

To do this, attach the 2-meter pole to the two trees in height from the waist to the chest. It is the horizontal support. If a standing tree is not available, build a bipod with shaped sticks or two tripods.

  • Place one end of the beams (3-Meter poles) on one side of the horizontal support. As with all shelters, be sure to put the back of the shelter in the wind.
  • Cross young trees or vines on beams.
  • Cover the frame with a brush, leaves, pine needles or grass, starting from the bottom and like shingles to the top.
  • Place straw, leaves, pine needles, or grass in the bedding.

In cold weather, add to the comfort of your trailer by building a fire reflector wall. Press four 1.5 meter long piles into the ground to support the wall. Stack the green logs between the support piles on top of each other. Form two rows of stacked logs to create an interior space in the wall that you can fill with dirt. This action not only strengthens the wall, but also makes it more heat-reflective. Tie the top of the support piles so that green logs and dirt remain in place.

With just a little more effort you can have a dryer. Cut some poles with a diameter of 2 cm (the length depends on the distance between the horizontal support of the trailer, and the top of the wall of the fire reflector). Place one end of the posts on the support and the other end on the reflector wall. Place and attach smaller sticks through these posts. Now you have a place to dry clothes, meat or fish.

Swamp bed in a swamp or swamp, or an area with standing water or constantly moist soil, the swamp bed prevents you from getting out of the water. When choosing such a location, consider the weather, wind, tides and available materials.

To make a swamp bed – * Look for four trees grouped in a rectangle, or cut four posts (bamboo is ideal) and press them firmly into the ground so that they form a rectangle. They must be far enough away and strong enough to support their size and weight, including equipment.

  • Cut two poles that cover the width of the rectangle. You also need to be strong enough to carry your weight.

Attach these two posts to the trees (or posts). Make sure they are high enough above ground or water to allow tides and flooding.

  • Cut additional posts that cover the length of the rectangle. Place them on the two side bars and attach them.
  • Cover the top of the bed frame with wide leaves or grass to form a soft lying surface.
  • Build a fire rug by placing clay, mud or clay on one that comes out of the swamp bed and letting it dry.

A further protection, designed to free you from the water or wet ground uses the same rectangular configuration as the swamp bed. They simply place sticks and branches lengthwise in the trees (or posts) until there is enough material to lift the lying surface above the water level.

Natural shelters do not neglect the natural formations that provide protection. Examples are caves, crevices, bushes, small depressions, large rocks on the wind sides of the hills, tall trees with low limbs and fallen trees with thick branches. When choosing a natural formation – * Stay away from low soils such as gorges, narrow valleys or stream beds. Low areas collect cold air at night and are therefore colder than the surrounding heights. Thick, bushy, low soil also hosts more insects.

  • Check for poisonous snakes, ticks, mites, Scorpions, and stinging ants.
  • Look for loose rocks, dead limbs, coconuts or any other natural growth that might fall on your shelter.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

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